Disillusioned:  “to free or be freed from illusion,” 1855, from a noun disillusion meaning “act of freeing from illusion” (1814); see dis- + illusion.  (Per the online website https://www.etymonline.com/ )

 

**

 

After getting the audio editor plug-in Torrential, the following words are audible in the

video prologue.  I will not cite them in my grant application for the documentary.

You do not use conditional words in these type of documents.

I don’t think there is any if or whether or contingent.  These are the acoustic traces of a

prophecy.  It’s freed – free to become something it’s longed for.

Undisputed.

The drive-in is desolate.  It’s discarded.  I hate it when timeless sites go without use.

 

These words are a census.

 

 

In this passage stands bade unsheathed channel þyrre

safe forsaken 

rang

 

Did you know that emendation has a remarkable linguistic origin?

It means “removal of errors; the correction of that which is erroneous or faulty”.

I don’t hear that word, I can read it on the

torrential

insignia

static register in modern terms means the sequence never changes.

 

 

 

8 Comments

  1. Nancy Bauer-King

    The narrator is more present in this draft and draws me further in to his exploration. Again, interesting words. “Pyrre” took me to my 1550 page American Heritage Dictionary, with no clear definition. I’d like an expansion of the word “emendation.” Removal of errors…

  2. sara lippmann

    Hi Trent, I love your take on the etymology prompt. Great choice of word to launch off with — and all that unfolds

    On the level of language. How conditional word have no place in grant applications — and how conditional words function as
    “the acoustic traces of a prophecy” — is just amazing, and profound.

    And I love the movement, from grant application, which rewards certainty — to the drive-in, and the disillusionment of sites that fall into disuse.

    And the poetry of —

    I don’t hear that word, I can read it on the

    torrential

    insignia

    static register in modern terms means the sequence never changes.

    Thanks for sharing. This is exhilarating writing — we all can learn from the elasticity of your language choices. I’d love to read more.

  3. Randal Houle

    Trent,

    Loved this idea of excavating (pardon the pun) an etymology as story. My favorite line has to be “These words are a census” I’d definitely like to see where this goes. Great work.

  4. Meg Tuite

    Trent,
    Great words to go with! “I don’t think there is any if or whether or contingent. These are the acoustic traces of a
    prophecy. It’s freed – free to become something it’s longed for.” And also, the loss of the ‘drive-in’. Heartbreaking!
    “These words are a census.” That sounds like the beginning or end of something! LOVE!

  5. Nancy Stohlman

    When I read this I feel like I’m reading blacked out transcripts, found documents. A puzzle. A map. A story, unearthed. A photo, torn. A water-damaged page. A mystery. xo

  6. Jonathan Cardew

    This is fantastic, Trent! I loved the technical tone of the piece, juxtaposes perfectly with the poetic turns. I really love the boldness of this switch:

    “In this passage stands bade unsheathed channel þyrre

    safe forsaken

    rang”

    No suggestions! Great read.

    –Jonathan

  7. April Bradley

    Oh this is so interesting, so much fun! Thank you for leading us along here with these words. Keep going!

  8. Kristen Ploetz

    I have to admit this was complex for me to read, and so I re-read it several times and that’s when I fully appreciated beauty of it, actually. It’s the kind of piece that highlights pretty quickly how previously chewed and digested so much writing is these days. I *like* that it took me a few times to get oriented, that it challenged me. It feels like it would be a hard piece to place because of this, but that’s precisely why it’s very good. The best passage for me was this (mostly due to the imagery of the drive-in): “The drive-in is desolate. It’s discarded. I hate it when timeless sites go without use. … These words are a census.” The use of “census” is BRILLIANT here.

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